National

Posted: February 05, 2016

Apollo 14 astronaut Edgar Mitchell dies at 85

In this 2011 photo, Edgar Mitchell holds up the “rational hand control” that he used to help land the Apollo 14 Lunar Module “Antares” on the moon in February of 1971. Mitchell explained that NASA allowed him and all of the astronauts of his day to keep mementos from their trips into space. Yet, after choosing to sell a lunar camera that was aboard the Apollo 14 moon mission, he was sued by NASA. (Damon Higgins/The Palm Beach Post)
In this 2011 photo, Edgar Mitchell holds up the “rational hand control” that he used to help land the Apollo 14 Lunar Module “Antares” on the moon in February of 1971. Mitchell explained that NASA allowed him and all of the astronauts of his day to keep mementos from their trips into space. Yet, after choosing to sell a lunar camera that was aboard the Apollo 14 moon mission, he was sued by NASA. (Damon Higgins/The Palm Beach Post)

By Staff Reports

Astronaut Edgar D. Mitchell, who was part of the Apollo 14 space crew that flew to the moon in 1971, died late Thursday in West Palm Beach, according to his family.

Mitchell, 85, lived in suburban Lake Worth and died at a local hospice at about 10 p.m. Thursday, his daughter, former West Palm Beach City Commissioner Kimberly Mitchell told The Palm Beach Post.

Mitchell’s ex-wife, Anita Mitchell, is a former Republican Party chairman for Palm Beach County and is currently former Florida governor and presidential candidate Jeb Bush’s Palm Beach County campaign chairman.

>>Read more trending stories

Mitchell was the sixth man to walk on the moon. He was part of a three-man crew, with Alan Shepard Jr. and Stuart Roosa, who took part in the Apollo 14 space mission. It was the eighth manned mission in the United States Apollo program and they became the third ever to land on the moon. Mitchell was the lunar module pilot on the mission.

Apollo 14 launched just over 45 years ago, on Jan. 31, 1971. The nine-day mission ended Feb. 9 when the crew landed in the South Pacific Ocean.

Unlike other astronauts who tend to live reclusive lives, Mitchell remained in the public eye.

In 2011, he turned over the camera he took to the moon to the Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum in Washington. The U.S. government filed a lawsuit against him in that same year, saying he stole the camera. Mitchell denied the allegations and said if it wasn’t for him, the camera would have never made it back to Earth.

>>Read more trending stories

Mitchell was born in Hereford, Texas, on Sept. 17, 1930 but considered his hometown Artesia, N.M., near Roswell. Mitchell was open about his views on the paranormal and psychic, and he founded the Institute of Noetic Sciences, which sponsors research into the nature of consciousness, or studying the unexplained. In his 1996 memoir, “The Way of the Explorer,” he described the experience on his return to Earth as life-changing.

“What I experienced during that three-day trip home was nothing short of an overwhelming sense of universal connectedness. I actually felt what has been described as an ecstasy of unity,” he said.

There are no comments yet. Be the first to post your thoughts. or Register.